Virtual Tour of a Super Energy Efficient Net Zero Home in Maine

Net Zero Home in Maine
Completing a passive solar thermal home

Net Zero Home in Maine – ( Solar Thermal Magazine)

If you are considering building a new home or renovating an existing home and you would like to know more about what can be done to make it more energy efficient than you may want to take the virtual tour of this home in Maine.The homeowner takes us on a walking tour of the feature of this recently completed home in Maine that he says may be the first of its kind in the state. 

Completing a passive solar thermal home

Completing a passive solar thermal home

This is a 3 bedroom home with a several bathrooms and other well designed features for any living space. Here are some of the energy efficient features that you will see:

1- Tall ceilings and large windows give the impression of spaciousness even though the home is in fact no large in area.

Huge windows in this passive solar home provide most of the heat load

Huge windows in this passive solar home provide most of the heat load

2- The large windows are situated to provide most of the heat load for the building with only a very small electric baseboard heater system to support it. The whole electric system only cost $500 to install.

3- A heat recovery system that captures waste heat from cooking and laundry for reuse in the home.

4- A clothes washer but no conventional dryer. A centrifugal spinner removes the water ( like the bathing suit spinners in the YMCA) and the clothes are then hung to dry inside by letting the heat recovery air travel by them.

Centrifigal wet laundy spinner then dry in this energy efficienct home

Centrifigal wet laundy spinner then dry in this energy efficienct home

5- Sufficient solar pv panels and solar thermal collectors to heat and power the home completely.

Solar panels and collectors for this passive solar house

Solar panels and collectors for this passive solar house

Although the homeowner does not mention it new advancements in LED light allow you have very high quality light that uses very little energy. Also if it was me I would add some battery backup capability, since this home uses so little power it would not be an expensive addition.  The window are very large but you can also add light tubes that direct the sunlight to dark regions of the home if you have small windows of say a basement.

This is not the only way to make a super energy efficiency home as there are other options such as geothermal heat pumps and very high levels of insulation but this is a really great design and we applaud the homeowner for showing such green initiative.

This home is considered net zero energy over the course of a year.

Enjoy the tour.

 

About Gordon Smith
Gordon's expertise in the area of industrial energy efficiency and alternative energy. He is an experienced electrical engineer with a Masters degree in Alternative Energy technology. He is the co-founder of several renewable energy media sites including Solar Thermal Magazine.