Can We Combat Climate Change with Regenerative Organic Agriculture?

Reducing atmospheric co2 and slowing climate change

Combat Climate Change – ( Solar Thermal Magazine)

Leading Fair Trade advocacy organization, Fair World Project (FWP), has released a new 17 min. documentary highlighting the role of industrial agriculture in climate change as well as detailing how small farmers are combating climate change through regenerative organic agriculture.

Narrated by Fair World Project’s Political Director¬†Ryan Zinn, the documentary traverses through a series of interviews with activists, farmers, and experts on organic farming, sustainability and food sovereignty. Luminaries like Dr. Vandana Shiva, Rodale Institute’s Mark “Coach” Smallwood, and Ronnie Cummins of the Organic Consumers Association expound on the benefits of agro-ecological practices in the face of climate crisis.

Reversing the impacts of climate change

Reversing the impacts of climate change

 

To view the film in English or in English with Spanish subtitles, go to: http://www.fairworldproject.com/cool.

“Climate change is the issue of our generation. Record-breaking heat waves, long-term drought, “100-year floods” in consecutive years, and increasingly extreme super storms are becoming the new normal. While global climate change will impact nearly everyone and everything, the greatest impact is already being felt by farmers and anyone who eats food,” said Ryan Zinn of Fair World Project.

When we think of climate change and global warming, visions of coal-fired power plants and solar panels come to mind. Policy discussions and personal action usually revolve around hybrid cars, energy-efficient homes and debates about the latest technological solutions. However, the global agriculture system is at the heart of both the problem and the solution.

“Small-Scale Farmers Cool the Planet” provides a compelling and succinct analysis to better understand the root causes and implications of climate change, as well as a path towards turning back the climate crisis while feeding the planet. As Dr. Vandana Shivacomments in the film,

Too much of the movement to deal with climate change is based on fear. It now needs to move to cultivating hope.

“Fair World Project is using this video to launch an international and national campaign to educate and engage global citizens and policy makers to invest in regenerative organic agriculture, support and safeguard small-scale farmers at home and abroad and regulate and restrict polluting industrial agriculture,” explains Dana Geffner, Executive Director of Fair World Project.

Addressing the climate crisis starts with transforming our food system with small-scale farmers and regenerative organic agriculture at the center.

Produced by Fair World Project, the video is a key component to a new educational campaign led by Fair World Project to raise awareness of agro-ecology and climate change during the month of May 2015 surrounding World Fair Trade Day.

World Fair Trade Day is comprised of retail and educational events occurring in over 1,000 locations across the country. The world wide day of celebration and awareness is a unique initiative that seeks to increase visibility around Fair Trade, the social movement and economic model that seeks to empower small-scale farmers and producers by creating an alternative, equitable trade system in which all participants have fair access to markets by building long-term relationships with buyers and access to means of sustainable development.

Fair World Project (FWP) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect the use of the term “fair trade” in the marketplace, expand markets for authentic fair trade, educate consumers about key issues in trade and agriculture, advocate for policies leading to a just economy, and facilitate collaborative relationships to create true system change.

FWP publishes a bi-annual publication entitledFor a Better World. For more information, visit: http://www.fairworldproject.org.

SOURCE Fair World Project

 

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