University of Iowa Enlisted to Aid Development of Using Solar Energy to Produce Hydrogen Fuel

hypersolar making clean hydrogen with solar energy
developing a low-cost, submersible hydrogen production particle that can split water molecules using sunlight without any other external systems

HyperSolar, Inc. (OTCQB: HYSR), the developer of a cutting edge technology to produce renewable hydrogen using sunlight and water, today announced that it has entered into a one year agreement with the University of Iowa to help accelerate the company’s research and development efforts to reach its goal of producing commercially viable renewable hydrogen.

The University of Iowa possesses a reputation for pioneering advancements in the renewable energy technologies and sustainable practices in and around the campus. Its state-of-the-art “Sustainable Energy Discovery District” initiative with Solar E-car charging station, alternative fuel vehicle fleet, solar panel technologies on Cambus Maintenance facility, etc. epitomizes its leadership role towards developing a sustainable future. Its excellence in energy efficiency research is well recognized and continues to grow. Recently, a graduate from University of Iowa was awarded top University recognition for her work with hydrogen fuel cell storage.

“We are thrilled to add experienced and knowledgeable scientists from yet another prestigious University to our research group,” said Tim Young, CEO of HyperSolar. “The great team at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) has helped us achieve a number major breakthroughs toward renewable hydrogen fuel production. We believe that the addition of the University of Iowa will help us reach the major milestone of 1.5 volts needed for direct solar water-splitting. We believe that reaching this major milestone will allow us to cost effectively produce renewable hydrogen at or near the point of distribution.”

The University of Iowa team will be led by Dr. Syed Mubeen Hussaini who joined the University as a Professor in August and has been instrumental in HyperSolar’s progress while leading the research at University of California, Santa Barbara.

HyperSolar’s technology is based on the concept of developing a low-cost, submersible hydrogen production particle that can split water molecules using sunlight without any other external systems or resources – acting as artificial photosynthesis.

 

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This post was prepared by Solar Thermal Magazine staff.

3 Comments

  • Vadla Akbar basha says:

    iam complete tha Diploma in computer Engineering i need a job

  • Vadla Akbar basha says:

    i need job

  • Saifur Rahman says:

    i am very eager to know about solar.but it is a matter of sorrow that there is no any field to know more about solar energy.moreover. i like this project.many many thanks to university of lowa

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